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Sacred Siblings

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Table of Contents

 
Dedication 
Foreword 
Acknowledgments 
Preface 
Introduction 1: The Who and the Why 
Introduction 2: An Invitation to More  

Section 1: Issues Revealed from a Married’s Perspective 

Chapter 1: Equally Valuing = Valuing Equally  
Chapter 2: Your Opinion Matters 
Chapter 3: Feedback Wanted . . . or Is It? 
Chapter 4: Effective Training Doesn’t Come Easy 
Chapter 5: It’s Impossible to Over-Communicate 
Chapter 6: When Hearing Voices Is OK 
Chapter 7: Sounding Boards Not Always Included 
Chapter 8: Who Is My Neighbor? 
Chapter 9: When Affirmation Gets Lost in Translation 
Chapter 10: Sacred-Sibling Relationships: Living Counterculturally  
Chapter 11: The Secret of Being Content Can Be Learned  

Section 2: Issues Revealed from a Single’s Perspective 

Chapter 12: Expecting Community and Finding Loneliness 
Chapter 13: Expecting to Be Considered Mature, but Disappointed 
Chapter 14: Expecting a Helping Hand and Not Always Finding One 
Chapter 15: Expecting More Time From Them When There Is Less Family  

Section 3: The Challenge 

Chapter 16: Loving Family Well and God More 
Chapter 17: Closing  

Appendix 1: The Invitation 
Appendix 2: The Letter (11/23/16) 
Appendix 3: The Survey

 

$9.99
Sacred Siblings
Valuing One Another for the Great Commission
Sue Eenigenburg and Suzy Grumelot
In Sacred Siblings: Valuing One Another for the Great Commission we learn about how teams come together with varying expectations of what team life should be. The authors offer ideas and positive practices of valuing one another based on a survey from 289 missionaries, representing 12 mission agencies. These practices not only build unity and understanding of each other, but enable greater effectiveness in ministry. 

Read this and have your agency make moves to be better prepared for the increasingly single next generation of field workers and take action for team effectiveness now. 

This book:

• Highlights 16 differences between the perspectives of married and single people.
• Offers helpful tools to address the challenges and enhance strengths.
• Asks applicational questions that would initiate dialogue among invested parties.
• Addresses the necessity of releasing physical family members to follow God’s leading.
• Points out differences in organizational policies and practices based upon marital status.

Endorsements

  • We are moving toward a world in which the majority of people will be single. In many cultures that time has already come. Yet, our mission environment is most often oriented around married couples. This book surfaces many of the issues that teams will face when members come from these two distinct life situations. As the authors point out in the book, it is easy for us to consider ourselves experts in understanding these challenges. Yet, there is little teaching and writing about this topic. This is a unique resource that readers will find to be relevant in our modern missions era.
    TED ESLERSacred Siblings: Valuing One Another for the Great Commission is one of those rare books that tackles an important subject with quantifiable research, together with captivating stories that illustrate key findings in the research. And what a great title—that we all view each other as “sacred siblings”—regardless of marital status. Eenigenburg and Grumelot are not content to just explain the challenges of sacred sibling relationships, of which there are many. They raise the bar and offer the reader much more by sharing practical and actionable suggestions to make these relationships all that God intends for them to be. If you’re looking for a very readable and thought-provoking book, this one is for you.
  • Sacred Siblings: Valuing One Another for the Great Commission is one of those rare books that tackles an important subject with quantifiable research, together with captivating stories that illustrate key findings in the research. And what a great title—that we all view each other as “sacred siblings”—regardless of marital status. Eenigenburg and Grumelot are not content to just explain the challenges of sacred sibling relationships, of which there are many. They raise the bar and offer the reader much more by sharing practical and actionable suggestions to make these relationships all that God intends for them to be. If you’re looking for a very readable and thought-provoking book, this one is for you.
    JOHN CERTALICExecutive Director, Caring for Others
  • Sacred Siblings provides us with a compilation of information that goes beyond the anecdotal stories of singles and marrieds serving side-by-side on ministry teams. Through illustrations, not only from Sue and Suzy, but those who participated in the surveys, we get a sense of the challenges, the joys, the disappointments, and the unmet expectations in life together. There are constructive suggestions of ways to serve one another in these sacred extended ministry family relationships. This will be helpful for those who prepare people pre-field, for those who are leading teams along with the couples and singles serving on the teams, and for those who have a ministry of care and consultation for overseas workers. I recommend that after reading it, opportunity is made for dialogue at team retreats and conferences.
    FAITH DE LA COURVice President & Chief People Officer, SIM, USA
  • If you are looking for a book that will help you discover for the first time, or go more in-depth into relationships between singles and marrieds in ministry, Sacred Siblings needs to be on your reading list. Sue Eenigenburg and Suzy Grumelot use their years of experience, coupled with survey results, to give the reader a better understanding of the issues, as well as provide practical tools that will help members thrive and be successful in the ministry to which God has called them.
    BRETT SHIDELERVP, Ministry and Care Resources | People Services, Wycliffe Bible Translators USA
  • Sue and Suzy focus on a particular but critical kind of diversity which exists among those serving in our churches and missions organizations: married couples and singles (and secondarily, men and women). Their research has enabled them to identify areas of life in ministry in which the surveyed marrieds and singles see things differently. In addition to encouraging ministry leaders to be more aware of and consider how to respond to such differences, the authors provide numerous practical suggestions and additional resources to help cultivate better relationships on teams with both married and single members and to increase their effectiveness in the mission.
    ERIC SCHLOTTMANLeadership Development and Human Resources team, Cru- Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Suzy and Sue show us our divergent perspectives as single and married team members and ask us to carefully reflect on several powerful questions as we serve together. We are truly sent to be ambassadors for Christ and to bring transformation; as we do, our Savior needs to be supremely evident in our relationships with one another. I’m grateful for their work in providing tangible steps for each of us to grow more in the image of Christ.
    BRENT MCHUGHInternational Director, Christar International
  • Relationships are more of a journey than a single moment. Ministry team relationships are especially susceptible to the bruises and pains of “missing one another” when assumptions are made about others or expectations go unmet from the team. Suzy & Sue provide us with a much needed framework for slowly and deliberately addressing the relational necessities of each team member, so that the team, community, and mission organization can more fully reflect the fullness of the Body of Christ. These are two sisters in whom I have great trust, and I commend this book to you, your team, or your organization.
    DAVID RIDDELLInternational Director, World Team
  • I was so drawn into this topic and your manuscript that I have sat on the side of my bed for hours tonight reading what you sent to me. Singles and married people and their children are all critical partners in missions. There are inevitable tensions there which must be dealt with biblically, sensitively and regularly. If God truly does have plans for us (for good . . . to give us a future and hope) then is single life better and more productive or is married life better? I say, let God write our story.
    STEVE SAINTfounder of ITEC, author of three books, and son of Nate Saint
  • By naming “un-named” dynamics that run our relationships, this book gives important insight for embracing greater potential to be enriched personally and professionally, as well as better expressing the heart of God as the people of God. Living and relating by assumptions and expectations is a path to diminished personhood. We all do it, and suffer for it! But we can learn to see each other as the multi-faceted adults that we are. In Sacred Siblings, you’ll find biblical perspectives and strong stories that unpack them! Traits such as single/married, male/female, introvert/extrovert only describe one aspect of who we are, so to consider how much weight a category bears in the way we think about someone is a good, stretching exercise that unleashes helpful perspectives to propel us out of our self-centric ruts—making us better people and so better missionaries. I’m grateful to have this important resource about learning to be the diverse, spiritual people of God that are building His Kingdom, and not defining the Body of Christ by anything less!
    WENDY WILSONExecutive Director, Women’s Development Track—Missio Nexus Network 
  • “Have you ever seen a majority group, culture, or race that was deeply sensitive to others in the minority? Surely the church should be the place where this is practiced and lived out.” (28) Empathy to “feel with” another person and seek to understand their experience, is a powerful tool for helping us to work together effectively. Often we study and seek to understand the people group we are trying to reach, their felt needs, concepts of God, etc., but we often miss taking time to hear the stories and hearts of our brothers and sisters serving beside us. When seeking to make organizational decisions, experiencing conflict or considering challenges, this gap can cause us to make assumptions, devalue our colleagues, or keep us from functioning as effectively as we could together. Sacred Siblings compiles many of these stories for us to peer inside others’ experiences, gives us questions to ask one another, and very practical tips for engaging and partnering together effectively.

    RACHEL HEFFIELD, PhDPCC-SThriving Catalyst-VP Member Development, Pioneers

Additional Details

  • Pages: 248
  • Publisher: William Carey Publishing
  • Binding: paperback
  • Publish Year: 2019
  • ISBN: 978-1-64508-216-3
  • Vendor: William Carey Publishing