Entries tagged with: Wea

Too Valuable To Lose

By: William D. Taylor, ed.

Does God really care about His servants? Yes! Do we care for our people who are serving the Lord in cross-cultural ministry? The Reducing Missionary Attrition Project (ReMAP), launched by World Evangelical Fellowship Missions Commission, seeks to answer that question in this important study. This book utilizes the findings of a 14-nation study done by ReMAP and will help supply some very encouraging answers.

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


One World or Many?

By: Richard Tiplady, ed.

This book considers in detail the key drivers of globalization, its contemporary shape, and its implications for world mission. It also looks at the impact of globalization on different contemporary issues affecting mission such as ethnicity, the environment, and global health as well as globalization’s effect on more traditional “missionary” questions of the world religions, contextualization, theology, and the church. One World or Many? is written by a variety of authors from all over the world.

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


Integral Ministry Training

By: Robert Brynjolfson & Jonathan Lewis, eds.

This manual is an invaluable resource for anyone from the global evangelical community who is involved with training people for ministry. As a textbook, it presents a biblical and educational framework for holistic training as well as a context-sensitive process for the design of new programs and the evaluation of existing programs. Packed with practical examples and aids, it is a tool trainers will keep handy and use often in their course planning and implementation.

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


Worth Keeping

By: Rob Hay, Valerie Lim, Detlef Bloecher, Jaap Ketelaar and Sarah Hay

"Worth Keeping is more than worth just reading. I urge church and missional leaders to reflect on the research and absorb the principles contained in this important volume. I am convinced if we put into practice its recommendations we will see more effective missionaries who feel valued as servants of the living God. Worth Keeping should be required reading for all mission leaders and local church mission teams." - Geoff Tunnicliffe, International Director, World Evangelical Alliance, Canada

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


Local Theology for the Global Church

By: Matthew Cook, Rob Haskell, Ruth Julian, and Natee Tanchanpongs, eds.

As the church in the global south continues to grow at a rapid pace, the question of how to develop local theologies becomes more and more urgent. This book charts a path forward through exegetical, theological and cultural analysis by scholars who are wrestling with the issues in their own situations around the globe. The contents were developed under the auspices of the World Evangelical Alliance Theological Commission at the Oxford contextualization consultation.

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


Global Mission

By: Rose Dowsett, ed.

Global Mission is divided into two sections: the first, Reflections and Foundations, comprises nine essays of a more general nature; the second, Contextualization at Work, contains twenty one essays of a more specific nature, most of them case studies from a particular location and people group. The thirty-three contributors come from five continents, and a host of contexts. Some are veterans, some quite young, but every one of them is passionate about God’s mission, and about building bridges for the gospel in a way that is absolutely faithful to Scripture but also sensitive to specific contexts. North and South, East and West, demonstrate precious unity in Christ in our common calling.

Contextualization is complex, and none of the authors claim to have got everything right. But their essays are thoughtful, and written out of love for God and love for his world. They tell the stories of trial and error, of struggles and triumphs, as each seeks to present Christ in terms that make sense and can be understood. It is following the process, quite as much as specific conclusions, which make this book valuable and transferable to many other parts of the global church. The essays also give us a peep into many different societies, and the birthing of faith in the grace of the Holy Spirit. Thus we give thanks to God for all that he is wonderfully doing around his world and stimulate our prayers for those who work cross-culturally, especially in pioneer situations.

Not all contributors agree on every point, especially when it comes to the difficulties of mission in the Muslim world (and increasingly, amongst Hindus). There has been no attempt to standardize different approaches, letting a robust conversation develop.

Each chapter ends with some suggested study questions, useful for personal reflection or group or class discussion. The book is deliberately accessible to lay people, but stimulating to career missionaries and academics.

We pray that it may serve the purposes of God, for his glory.

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


Sorrow & Blood

By:

On behalf of the WEA Mission Commission, William Carey Library is pleased to launch a landmark anthology and resource.

This is a new publication in the Globalization of Mission series, Sorrow & Blood: Christian Mission in Contexts of Suffering, Persecution, and Martyrdom. The editorial team of William Taylor (USA), Tonica van der Meer (Brazil), and Reg Reimer (Canada) worked over four years to compile this unique resource anthology.

This book is the product of the Mission Commission's global missiology task force and a worldwide team of committed colleagues and writers. Some 62 writers from 23 nations have collaborated to generate this unique global resource and anthology. Ajith Fernando of Sri Lanka and Christopher Wright of the UK each wrote prefaces to the book

This latest WEA volume has the potential of profoundly shaping our approach to mission in today’s challenging and increasingly dangerous world.


The Church in Mission (WEA)

By: Bertil Ekström

What does it mean today to be a church totally committed to the gospel and fully engaged in God’s mission? What major religious and sociological trends in our world are affecting the role of the global church and local churches? How must we understand and be prepared to face these trends? How do we define “church” in the twenty-first century, being faithful to the Scriptures and at the same time relevant to a generation that does not believe in the institutional church anymore? What are some good models of missional churches in different regions of the world that will encourage and inspire those who long to see a church making difference in society and in the world?

These are some of the issues that the book you are holding in your hands addresses. There are certainly no final answers and magical forms; rather, we present a broad and deep discussion on how the gospel should be lived out by Jesus’ followers in our time and through our communities. Questions are raised and analyzed both from the perspective of a local church as well as from a global and general understanding of the Christian church. Some of our examples will focus more on local realities, others more on global challenges.

The first part of the book is dedicated to a biblical and theological reflection on gospel, church, and mission. It includes Old and New Testament studies on the theological implications of being church, based on the biblical narrative. The second part deals with a variety of contemporary missiological issues related to the broader theme of church and mission. Different perspectives from current discussions and dialogues around the globe are included, covering both ideological reflections and practical aspects of being a mission-shaped church. The third part presents regional and national case studies that show the enormous creativity in church planting and engagement of local communities in their own societies. Models applied in the secularized Europe are contrasted to ways of functioning as church in fast growing congregations in the global South.