Entries tagged with: History

Crisis and Hope In Latin America

By: Emilio Nunez and William Taylor

This book provides a panoramic yet thorough study of kingdom advance in Latin America. Part one examines the historical, socio-political, and religious context. Part two probes into post-conciliar Roman Catholicism, the charismatic movements, contextualization, and social responsibility. Part three explores the implications for churches and mission agencies.


The 25 Unbelievable Years

By: Ralph D. Winter

“... a brief, readable course in modern world geography and political history . . . puts the Pope, Billy Graham, the World Council of Churches, the world pentecostal movement, the population explosion, Mao Tze Tung and Biafra into a single picture, and tells us with hard statistics what has happened to Christianity and the World Christian Mission . . . . Illuminates crucial issues no one else is even thinking about . . . . a brilliant piece of work.” –C. Peter Wagner


The Evangelization of the World

By:

Written in an engaging style and intended largely for a lay audience, The Evangelization of the World tells the remarkable story of how Christianity grew from an insignificant Jewish sect in the first century until, by the beginning of the twenty-first century, it had become the world’s first truly global religion.

The book is careful to explain historical context and mission theory, but the foci of the narrative are the great personalities of mission—the Apostle Paul, St. Martin of Tours, St. Patrick, St. Francis Xavier, John Eliot, Count Von Zinzendorf, William Carey, Robert Morrison, David Livingstone, Mary Slessor, Albert Schweitzer, and many others—who make this account of the expansion of the church a fascinating and often dramatic tale.

In addition, the book does not neglect the great mission conferences of the twentieth century, nor does it avoid the controversial aspects of mission that, in many instances, continue to vex the movement today.


Health for All

By: Daniel Fountain

When Dan Fountain and his wife arrived in the Congo in 1961, the challenges to effective medical missions seemed overwhelming. As the only doctor for a quarter of a million residents of the Vanga Health Zone, and with nothing but a dilapidated mission hospital and an undertrained staff to run it, Dr. Fountain turned to prayer, innovation, and local partnerships to meet the vast needs of his area.

Health for All tells the story of an ever-increasing vision—from curative care to community health, from a barely functioning hospital to a network of successful health services, from a lack of qualified workers to a local residency training program, from biomedical reductionism to whole person care, from cultural stalemate to worldview transformation.  Dr. Fountain’s insights into health and wholeness have changed countless lives and communities. Part memoir, part history, part textbook, Health for All is the legacy of a man who patterned his life and labor after that of the Great Physician.