Entries tagged with: Fuller

Introduction to Missiology

By: Alan Tippett

While teaching at Fuller School of World Mission, Tippett inspired and challenged the founding generation of “great commission” or “church growth” missiologists. This collection brings together almost 40 of his best writings. In a style that is both academic and personal, he deals first with missiological theory then with anthropological and historical dimensions of missiology. He then treats a number of specific missiological problems from these perspectives including seminal material on power encounters.


Reaching the Resistant (EMS 6)

By: J. Dudley Woodberry, ed.

The lands where Muslims, Jews, and Christians have encountered each other are littered with the ruins of fortresses. Each faith community built barriers to keep out the enemies of their faith. The present studies look at the barriers erected by peoples considered resistant to the gospel, and the bridges God is using to carry the gospel to them.


Communicating Jesus’ Way (Revised)

By: Charles H. Kraft

This greatly expanded edition of Kraft’s book Communicating the Gospel God’s Way guides us in our attempt to understand how God seeks to communicate the gospel to unbelievers. Kraft shows that God desires His people to deliver His message through human life not merely formulaic explanations or printed words.


Culture, Communication and Christianity

By: Charles Kraft

Charles Kraft is a well-known author, educator, linguist, anthropologist, and missiologist. This book consists of his selected writings compiled over more than three decades. Subjects including anthropology, communication, worldview, ethnolinguistics, hermeneutics, and contextualization are dealt with as they relate to Christianity and Kraft’s unique perspective. Kraft’s personal story and an exhaustive bibliography of his personal writings (from 1961-2000) are included. This book is of extraodrinary value to those who desire to study Christianity, culture and communication, and the interplay between all three.


The Deep Sea Canoe

By: Alan R. Tippett

This updated version of Tippett’s 1977, The Deep Sea Canoe, describes a significant but often overlooked aspect of the expansion of Christianity in the South Pacific, that of South Sea Island believers who carried the gospel from one island to another in their deep sea canoes. It is a well-researched study by one who knew the islands and their people, a man known by the Fijians as one who spoke their language.


Worldview for Christian Witness

By: Charles H. Kraft

In Worldview for Christian Witness, Charles Kraft invites readers to understand REALITY as God sees it by learning to take seriously the insights of other societies. The diversity of cultures can seem obvious, but to really understand the significance of those surface level differences, one needs to understand the deep level assumptions on which they are based.


Introduction to Missiological Research Design

By: Edgar J. Elliston

Edgar Elliston’s Introduction to Missiological Research Design outlines the basic issues of research design for missiological and church-related research. This book describes the logic of the research process for a wide range of missiological research. Whether this research is from a single academic discipline or a multidisciplinary approach, this text will provide relevant guidelines for the design.

Elliston provides instruction, examples, and exercises for inexperienced but serious researchers as they seek to design research that will serve the Church in mission. Elliston also provides experienced researchers with checklists and easy-to-review tables to further aid in research design. This text raises some of the key issues to designing research in a multicultural or cross-cultural context and guides researchers toward ethical and effective study.


The Jesus Documents

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate printed articles. These books— encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory— broaden the contours of the discipline.

Throughout The Jesus Documents, Alan Tippett’s distinguished skills in missiology and anthropology demonstrate that biblical studies and cultural anthropology are disciplines that must be integrated for holistic biblical understanding. Tippett opens our eyes to the intentional missional nature of all four Gospels, showing that they “were the fruit of the Christian mission itself, the proof that the apostles obeyed the Great Commission” as they “worked out their techniques for cross-cultural missionary communication” with cultural sensitivity.


Donald McGavran, His Early Life and Ministry

By: Vern Middleton

This biography is more than one man’s interpretation of another person’s life—it has numerous traits of an autobiography. Donald McGavran, His Early Life and Ministry: An Apostolic Vision for Reaching the Nations includes insights gleaned from archives, as well as hours of discussion with both Donald and Mary McGavran about the interpretation applied to particular events.


The Ralph D. Winter Story

By: Harold Fickett

Legendary missionary strategist Ralph D. Winter always provoked strong reactions, one way or another. This long overdue book captures both the genius and the controversy of a self-described “social engineer,” named by Time magazine as one of the 25 Most Influential Evangelicals in America.


The Ways of the People

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate printed articles. These books— encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory— broaden the contours of the discipline. Missionaries and anthropologists have a tenuous relationship. While often critical of missionaries, anthropologists are indebted to missionaries for linguistic and cultural data as well as hospitality and introductions into the local community. In The Ways of the People, Alan Tippett provides a critical history of missionary anthropology and brings together a superb reader of seminal anthropological contributions from missionaries Edwin Smith, R. H. Codrington, Lorimer Fison, Diedrich Westermann, Henri Junod, and many more.
Twenty years as a missionary in Fiji, following pastoral ministry in Australia and graduate degrees in history and anthropology, provide the rich data base that made Alan R. Tippett a leading missiologist of the twentieth century. Tippett served as Professor of Anthropology and Oceanic Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary.


The Road to Bau and the Autobiography of Joeli Bulu

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series
augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate
printed articles. These books—encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory—broaden the contours of the discipline.

English missionary John Hunt and Tongan missionary Joeli Bulu served in the Fiji islands in the 1840s. Their lives
were intertwined as they faced the social issues of island warfare, cannibalism, and the ills brought to the Pacific
by traders and those involved in the labor trade. In this fascinating two-volume book Alan Tippett first provides
the biography of Hunt, then together with Tomasi Kanailagi gives us the thoroughly researched and annotated
autobiography of Joeli Bulu.

Twenty years as a missionary in Fiji, following pastoral ministry in Australia and graduate degrees in history and
anthropology, provide the rich data base that made Alan R. Tippett a leading missiologist of the twentieth century.
Tippett served as Professor of Anthropology and Oceanic Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary.


No Continuing City

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-tolocate printed articles. These books—encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory—broaden the contours of the discipline. As a gift to Edna and the children on the occasion of their golden wedding anniversary, Tippett completed his autobiography, ironically just months prior to his death. Containing personal reflections on his childhood and later mission experiences in the South Pacific, relationship with Donald McGavran and the founding of the School of World Mission, and retirement years in Australia, No Continuing City is the inside story. These are Tippett’s Personal reflections that can be found in no other publication. Twenty years as a missionary in Fiji, following pastoral ministry in Australia and graduate degrees in history and anthropology, provide the rich data base that made Alan R. Tippett a leading missiologist of the twentieth century. Tippett served as Professor of Anthropology and Oceanic Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary.


Fullness of Time

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate printed articles. These books—encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory— broaden the contours of the discipline.

Tippett believed his writings on ethnohistory were his most original contribution to the discipline of missiology.  The wealth of material in Fullness of Time is his best ethnohistory writing—most of which has never been published.  Explore the methods and models of this captivating field of study. Realize how documents, oral tradition, and even artifacts can be used to recreate the cultural situation of a prior time. Learn about the South Pacific, Ethiopia, Hawaii, and Australia, both in and through time.


Slippery Paths in the Darkness:

By: Alan R. Tippett

A primary concern amongst missiologists is presenting the gospel in a way that is culturally relevant without adulterating the essential truths of the message. The ability to appropriately contextualize this message is the difference between establishing an indigenous Christianity as opposed to introducing syncretism. In this compendium of presentations and papers, the issue is addressed with regard to the idea of covenant relationship with the Lord. Drawing from interdisciplinary research across continents, Tippett examines the syncretistic religious behaviors eminent at the time of his writing that threatened to fracture this covenant relationship— from eastern personality cults in India to scientology in Australia, from satanism in the United States to animism in Mexico. While his research only spans a set number of years, Tippett provides timeless insights for a global church burdened with the Great Commission call in an increasingly pluralistic world.


The Integrating Gospel & the Christian: Fiji 1835-67

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate printed articles. These books—encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory—broaden the contours of the discipline.


This volume contains two manuscripts. The first, The Integrating Gospel, combines a historical ethnolinguistic study of Fijian language, an examination of Fijian culture patterns in interaction with the church, and Tippett’s own firsthand experience as a communicator of the gospel to specific receptors at a specific place and point in time. From this, Tippett is able to extrapolate broader ideas on contextualization and methods of gospel transmission.


In The Christian: Fiji 1835–67, Tippett addresses the establishment of the Christian church and the spread of Christianity in Fiji, with special attention to Ratu Cakobau. In this brief but in-depth study, Tippett presents a strong case against the understanding that Fijian conversions to Christianity were primarily political, as he offers evidence of the genuine religious and spiritual experiences behind these conversions.