Entries tagged with: Family

Family and Faith in Asia (SEANET 7)

By: Paul De Neui, ed.

If Christian mission in Asia and most of the non-Western world is ever to advance, it must seriously consider the importance of family networks. Far too long the strategy of a “one by one” approach has stifled the spread of the gospel, reinforced a highly individualized unbiblical theology and destroyed social relationships that might lead to conversation, conversion and social transformation. With this concern in mind, SEANET is proud to present another volume in its series addressing critical missiological issues relevant to the practice of mission in Buddhist, Asian and many other contexts. Our title, Family and Faith in Asia: The Missional Impact of Extended Networks, attempts to issue a wake-up call to serious reflection on a highly ignored social reality in Buddhist and many other social contexts. The book is a resource useful for anyone wishing to study practical approaches to issues related to family and faith in Asia, particularly in Buddhist contexts for mission.


The Missionary Family (EMS 22)

By: Dwight P. Baker and Robert J. Priest (editors)

The title of this book points to a feature—the missionary family—often considered to be a distinctive of the Protestant missionary movement. Certainly the presence of missionary families in the field has been a central factor in enabling, configuring, and restricting Protestant missionary outreach. What special concerns does sending missionary families raise for the conduct of mission? What means are available for extending care and support to missionary families? These issues are the focus of the chapters in part 1 of this book.

In recent years an increasing number of reports have surfaced of sexual abuse in mission settings. Some reports have been based on “recovered memories,” the assessment of which raises difficult questions. Clearly sexual abuse in mission settings and how to understand allegations of abuse based on recovered memories are matters of grave concern to mission agencies and mission supporters as well as to missionary families. Part 2 serves the mission community by scrutinizing such matters, offering legal, historical, and psychological perspectives on the topic.

In a new feature, “Forum on Sexual Orientation and Mission: An Evangelical Discussion,” the Evangelical Missiological Society takes up a pressing issue of our day. Fourteen evangelical scholars participate in the discussion found in part 3.  Far from being the final word, this forum is presented with the prayer that it will serve as an opening to and basis for ongoing missiological conversation about an urgent and timely topic.