Entries tagged with: Cross-cultural

Preparing to Serve

By: David Harley

The author’s study of missionary training has taken him all over the world. In this work, he shares lessons learned from both Western and non-Western missionary training regarding training, clear objectives, getting started, the profile of a trainer, selecting trainees, the marks of effective training, holistic equipping, contextualized curriculum, and careful assessment of the entire training process.


Career-Defining Crises in Mission

By: Paul Keidel

Career-Defining Crises in Mission is written to help missionaries evaluate their ministry approaches and to pursue those that place relationships over programs. Each of the 12 chapters takes a well-known missiological principle and, instead of focusing on the theory behind it, uses Bible studies, illustrations, true stories, and practical suggestions to encourage missionaries to make decisions that cultivate relationships with people as they choose mission methods.


Screams in the Desert

By: Sue Eenigenburg

Screams in the Desert is an invitation to participate in one woman’s cross-cultural journey and the lessons she learns along the way. Sue Eenigenburg’s poignant and humorous accounts of life overseas provide insight into issues that many women encounter in the mission field. Join Sue for trips to the zoo, bouts of illness, landmine fields, miscommunications, and other everyday experiences of life in a foreign country. Providing women with examples to learn by, scripture to meditate on, and space to write about personal experiences, Screams in the Desert offers hope and humor to women working cross-culturally.


Suffering (SEANET 8)

By: Paul De Neui, ed.

What is dukkha? In Buddhism this word encompasses the concepts of dis-ease, unsteadiness, sorrow, and lack of inner calm. In English it is usually translated simply as “suffering”. However it is defined, dukkha is central to understanding Buddhism. The Buddha described not only what it was, but taught that there is a way out of it.

Suffering is an undeniable theme in both Christianity and Buddhism. Both treat the topic with great intensity. Buddha taught that suffering was inherent to the mortal condition. Christ was born into a life of suffering and called disciples to follow him in this path. Through enlightenment Buddha pointed to a way out of suffering. Through his death Christ suffered once for all. Both groups experience suffering but often talk about it from completely different starting points. Are there insights from each perspective that can inform the other? We believe so.

Suffering: Christian Reflections on the Buddhist Dukkha is a collection of articles by Western and non-Western Christ followers for those who want to delve deeper into one important aspect of Buddhist worldview. It is written for the practitioner privileged to live and serve in the Buddhist context. This book is also for the Buddhist seeking to understand the Christian perspective on existence in today’s world where suffering is our ever-present reality.


Frontline Women

By: Marguerite G. Kraft, ed.

Frontline Women is a collection of writings on women’s issues from those who have had mission field experience. Each author has special interest and expertise in the area in which he or she has written.
In the past we have failed to understand the significance of gender in mission work. Though women have historically been the majority in mission service, they have not been allowed much say in policies or strategizing. This book deals with gender differences in many areas of life and how that affects service to God in mission work. Women’s God-given gifting is meant to complement that of men and needs to be recognized, appreciated, and made use of in the day-by-day functioning of missions. In some mission agencies changes are being made in regard to women’s role and care. In this edition the authors have updated and added new information from their research and experience.
Contributors include: Marla Campbell, Dianne Collard, Donna Downes, Ruth Ann Graybill, Steve Hoke, Charles Kraft, Judith Lingenfelter, Laurel McAllister, Sheryl Silzer, and Sharon Soper.


The Multilingual God

By: Steve Fortosis

Some decades ago the prospect of reaching the entire world with the gospel appeared very dim indeed. In a world population that was virtually exploding with growth, how could Christians begin to reach the billions of fellow humans? Then missionaries began mastering the multiplied languages on earth, placing the Bible on paper, making recordings of the gospel, and beaming the Word of God out on radio and television waves. A portion of the Bible was translated painstakingly into over a thousand languages. The entire Bible was translated into several hundred. There was reason to be hopeful. Missionaries taught nationals how to plant churches. Then nationals started planting churches, and churches begat churches . . . Bible translators had and continue to play a crucial role in the mission of reaching every people with the gospel, and this book describes how. Follow them into the fascinating, exciting world of Bible translation.


More Screams, Different Deserts

By: Sue Eenigenburg

More Screams, Different Deserts is another invitation to join Sue on her adventures in cross-cultural living and biblical studies that have helped her along the way. With twenty-seven years of experience in cross cultural ministry, Sue realizes that joy and perseverance are essential for thriving in life and ministry. Her stories and insights encourage women to look to Jesus, our only hope wherever we live. Stories, ranging from one corner of the world to another, include discovering a forgotten museum, protecting her children from chocolate, visiting a camel market, and meeting wild pigs on a nighttime walk. God has been her refuge, and his Word held her steady when all she really wanted to do was run away and hide. Questions and resources at the end of each chapter will help readers think through personal application and find additional help.


Leading Multicultural Teams

By: Evelyn and Richard Hibbert

Churches and mission agencies are increasingly characterized by cultural diversity. As a result, many Christians find themselves working as part of a multicultural team. Leading these teams is a complex challenge that requires team leaders to understand how to help multicultural teams thrive. Team leaders need to know how to help team members grow in particular qualities and acquire specific skills related to multicultural teamwork. This book integrates insights from the Bible, team theory, leadership, and intercultural studies to explain how leaders of multicultural teams can help their teams become enriching and enjoyable  contexts to work in, at the same time as achieving their purpose.


Lessons Learned in the Lion’s Den

By: Daniel Waheli

Lessons Learned in the Lion’s Den shares the journey of one missionary family as the father is detained in a predominantly Muslim country in Africa.  Daniel Waheli’s time spent in prison is ripe for building intimacy with the Lord in the midst of confusion, suffering, and uncertainty. The accounts of his wife and two young children offer a glimpse into the inner life of the family during this trying time. The heart of this story is not a man imprisoned, but a family united—in hope, love, and a pressing desire that God be glorified in all things.

In a world where mission strategies come and go and often fall short of being effective, Waheli distills his experience into twelve principles for building character to better serve the Lord and persevere in His call. Whether you are a pioneer among unreached people groups or simply a Christian hungry to see Jesus glorified in your daily life, these tried and true concepts will prepare you to endure in the face of hardship.