Entries tagged with: Contextualization

Scripture and Strategy (EMS 1)

By: David Hesselgrave

David Hesselgrave uses the work of ten influential men to describe what is going on in missions. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the use of the Bible in the church and in mission, from the study of the Bible to teaching biblical principles to church leaders on the mission field.

As the first title in the new Evangelical Missiological Society series, this textbook is designed for use in addressing:

Contemporary Issues in Missions, Mission Strategy, Theology of Mission, Survey of Mission, Mission Principles and Practices, Strategy for World Evangelization, Church Planting, Church Growth, and Contextualization.


Crisis and Hope In Latin America

By: Emilio Nunez and William Taylor

This book provides a panoramic yet thorough study of kingdom advance in Latin America. Part one examines the historical, socio-political, and religious context. Part two probes into post-conciliar Roman Catholicism, the charismatic movements, contextualization, and social responsibility. Part three explores the implications for churches and mission agencies.


Following Jesus in the Hindu Context

By: H. L. Richard

Narayan Vaman Tilak was raised in western India in a Brahmin family as a Hindu of the highest caste. He was an ardent nationalist and gifted poet. Baptized in 1895, he remained one of the most highly placed Hindu leaders to turn to faith in Jesus Christ. This book tells Tilak’s story as a pioneer in Protestant mission history.


Contextualization and Syncretism (EMS 13)

By: Gailyn Van Rheenen, ed

“Culture’s influence upon Christianity is easier to discern in retrospect than in prospect. If history is our guide, one thing is sure: This age will be as syncretistic as any other…How is the gospel being contextualized in the contemporary world? To what degree are these new contextualizations syncretistic? This book attempts to answer these questions by defining and analyzing contextualization and syncretism.”–Gailyn Van Rheenen


That Man Who Came to Us

By: Sawai Chinnawong & Paul De Neui

That Man Who Came to Us tells the story of the life of Jesus Christ through traditional Thai art. Featuring black and white line drawings inspired by an art form born in northern and central Thailand, That Man tells the story of Christ as fully God, yet fully human. Artist Sawai Chinnawong employs the regions’ popular distinctive artistic style originally used to depict Buddhist moral principles and other religious themes.

A meditative and teaching tool, That Man is a simple yet powerful book that communicates Christ in both the Thai and English languages. The book also includes cultural notes and scripture references for further study. By depicting Christ in the context of Thai tradition, That Man proves the many ways Christ is present—and can be found—in every culture.


Global Mission

By: Rose Dowsett, ed.

Global Mission is divided into two sections: the first, Reflections and Foundations, comprises nine essays of a more general nature; the second, Contextualization at Work, contains twenty one essays of a more specific nature, most of them case studies from a particular location and people group. The thirty-three contributors come from five continents, and a host of contexts. Some are veterans, some quite young, but every one of them is passionate about God’s mission, and about building bridges for the gospel in a way that is absolutely faithful to Scripture but also sensitive to specific contexts. North and South, East and West, demonstrate precious unity in Christ in our common calling.

Contextualization is complex, and none of the authors claim to have got everything right. But their essays are thoughtful, and written out of love for God and love for his world. They tell the stories of trial and error, of struggles and triumphs, as each seeks to present Christ in terms that make sense and can be understood. It is following the process, quite as much as specific conclusions, which make this book valuable and transferable to many other parts of the global church. The essays also give us a peep into many different societies, and the birthing of faith in the grace of the Holy Spirit. Thus we give thanks to God for all that he is wonderfully doing around his world and stimulate our prayers for those who work cross-culturally, especially in pioneer situations.

Not all contributors agree on every point, especially when it comes to the difficulties of mission in the Muslim world (and increasingly, amongst Hindus). There has been no attempt to standardize different approaches, letting a robust conversation develop.

Each chapter ends with some suggested study questions, useful for personal reflection or group or class discussion. The book is deliberately accessible to lay people, but stimulating to career missionaries and academics.

We pray that it may serve the purposes of God, for his glory.

 

This book was published in partnership with the World Evangelical Alliance.


Christianity and Animism in Melanesia

By: Kenneth Nehrbass

In this book, Kenneth Nehrbass examines the interaction between traditional or animistic religion (called kastom) and Christianity in Vanuatu. First, he briefly outlines major anthropological theories of animism, then he examines eight aspects of animism on Tanna Island and shows how they present a challenge to Christianity. He traces the history of Christianity on Tanna from 1839 to the present, showing which missiological theories the various missionaries were implementing. Nehrbass wanted to find out what experiences in the lives of the islanders distinguished those who left traditional religion behind from those who held on to it. In the end, he contends that there are twenty factors of gospel response and cultural integration that determine whether an animistic background believer will be a mixer, separator, transplanter, or contextualizer.


Slippery Paths in the Darkness:

By: Alan R. Tippett

A primary concern amongst missiologists is presenting the gospel in a way that is culturally relevant without adulterating the essential truths of the message. The ability to appropriately contextualize this message is the difference between establishing an indigenous Christianity as opposed to introducing syncretism. In this compendium of presentations and papers, the issue is addressed with regard to the idea of covenant relationship with the Lord. Drawing from interdisciplinary research across continents, Tippett examines the syncretistic religious behaviors eminent at the time of his writing that threatened to fracture this covenant relationship— from eastern personality cults in India to scientology in Australia, from satanism in the United States to animism in Mexico. While his research only spans a set number of years, Tippett provides timeless insights for a global church burdened with the Great Commission call in an increasingly pluralistic world.


One Gospel for All Nations

By: Jackson Wu

The Bible tells us what to believe––the gospel. Did you know it also shows how to contextualize the gospel? In One Gospel for All Nations, Jackson Wu does more than talk about principles. He gets practical. When the biblical writers explain the gospel, they consistently use a pattern that is both firm and flexible. Wu builds on this insight to demonstrate a model of contextualization that starts with interpretation and can be applied in any culture. In the process, he explains practically why we must not choose between the Bible and culture. Wu highlights various implications for both missionaries and theologians. Contextualization should be practical, not pragmatic; theological, not theoretical.


Understanding Insider Movements

By: Harley Talman and John Jay Travis- editors

For the first time in history, large numbers of people from the world’s major non-Christian religions are following Jesus as Lord. Surprisingly for many Western Christians, they are choosing to do so within the religious communities of their birth and outside of institutional Christianity.  How does this work, and how should we respond to these movements?

This long-awaited anthology brings together some of the best writings on the topic of insider movements. Diverse voices explore this phenomenon from the perspectives of Scripture, history, theology, missiology, and the experience and identity of insider believers.  Those who are unfamiliar with the subject will find this book a crucial guide to a complex conversation. Students and instructors of mission will find it useful as a reader and reference volume. Field workers and agencies will discover in these chapters welcome starting points for dialogue and clearer communication.

The first book to provide a comprehensive survey of the topic of insider movements, Understanding Insider Movements is an indispensable companion for those who want to glimpse the creative, unexpected, boundary-crossing ways God is at work among the peoples of the world in their diverse religious communities.