Entries tagged with: Anthropology

The Deep Sea Canoe

By: Alan R. Tippett

This updated version of Tippett’s 1977, The Deep Sea Canoe, describes a significant but often overlooked aspect of the expansion of Christianity in the South Pacific, that of South Sea Island believers who carried the gospel from one island to another in their deep sea canoes. It is a well-researched study by one who knew the islands and their people, a man known by the Fijians as one who spoke their language.


The Jesus Documents

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate printed articles. These books— encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory— broaden the contours of the discipline.

Throughout The Jesus Documents, Alan Tippett’s distinguished skills in missiology and anthropology demonstrate that biblical studies and cultural anthropology are disciplines that must be integrated for holistic biblical understanding. Tippett opens our eyes to the intentional missional nature of all four Gospels, showing that they “were the fruit of the Christian mission itself, the proof that the apostles obeyed the Great Commission” as they “worked out their techniques for cross-cultural missionary communication” with cultural sensitivity.


The Road to Bau and the Autobiography of Joeli Bulu

By: Alan R. Tippett

Alan Tippett’s publications played a significant role in the development of missiology. The volumes in this series
augment his distinguished reputation by bringing to light his many unpublished materials and hard-to-locate
printed articles. These books—encompassing theology, anthropology, history, area studies, religion, and ethnohistory—broaden the contours of the discipline.

English missionary John Hunt and Tongan missionary Joeli Bulu served in the Fiji islands in the 1840s. Their lives
were intertwined as they faced the social issues of island warfare, cannibalism, and the ills brought to the Pacific
by traders and those involved in the labor trade. In this fascinating two-volume book Alan Tippett first provides
the biography of Hunt, then together with Tomasi Kanailagi gives us the thoroughly researched and annotated
autobiography of Joeli Bulu.

Twenty years as a missionary in Fiji, following pastoral ministry in Australia and graduate degrees in history and
anthropology, provide the rich data base that made Alan R. Tippett a leading missiologist of the twentieth century.
Tippett served as Professor of Anthropology and Oceanic Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary.


Slippery Paths in the Darkness:

By: Alan R. Tippett

A primary concern amongst missiologists is presenting the gospel in a way that is culturally relevant without adulterating the essential truths of the message. The ability to appropriately contextualize this message is the difference between establishing an indigenous Christianity as opposed to introducing syncretism. In this compendium of presentations and papers, the issue is addressed with regard to the idea of covenant relationship with the Lord. Drawing from interdisciplinary research across continents, Tippett examines the syncretistic religious behaviors eminent at the time of his writing that threatened to fracture this covenant relationship— from eastern personality cults in India to scientology in Australia, from satanism in the United States to animism in Mexico. While his research only spans a set number of years, Tippett provides timeless insights for a global church burdened with the Great Commission call in an increasingly pluralistic world.